Home

header1

Why should I help?  

If your child is between the ages of 12-16, we are seeking their involvement in an important study that will help us to understand more about how young people spend their free time. This will help us to identify which activities affect young people’s health and wellbeing.  

Will my child’s answers to these questionnaires be kept private?  

All data will be kept confidential. No personal information (name or identification number) will be recorded in this research and no information about individuals will be given to the schools that participate. All data will be processed anonymously. The results of this study might be presented online or in a scientific journal, but the data is not traceable to an individual.

What does participation involve?  

Children will be asked to fill out an online questionnaire every evening for a week in which they will answer questions about how they spent their leisure time during that day. This will take around 15 minutes to complete. Before the children start, we will ask them once a series of questions about other aspects of their lives such as their friendships, mood, and bullying. This will take about 30 minutes to complete.  

Your child’s participation in this survey is voluntary. If you agree to them participating in this study, you or your child can indicate at any time that you wish to withdraw, without having to give an explanation.  

How can I help?  

If your child’s school has been invited to participate in the research, a letter with a consent form will have been given to you by your child’s teacher, or you can download it here from the website. Depending on the age of you child, we may also need your consent for your child to take part in this study. Please refer to the consent form for more information.    

What if I have more questions?

If you need more information about the study, you could send an email to this address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..      

 

Project lead: Prof. Carolien Rieffe This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

The Network 'Musea Bekennen Kleur'

June 24th, 2020

Hendrick Heerschop Koning Caspar 1654. Olieverf op paneel. Berlijn Staatliche Museen ze Berlin 971x1200

Hendrick Heerschop, Koning Caspar, 1654 of 1659.
          Credit: Berlijn, Staatliche Museen Preussischen Kulturbesitz, Gemäldegaleri. 

What is the representation of people of color within art? Do young people of color also feel their norms and values reflected in the museum collection. The new network of Dutch museums aims to embed diversity and inclusion in the museum and heritage sector in a sustainable manner by providing educational programs. Carolien gave her input drawing from past research and experience on children and young people - "Black Lives Matter (BLM) is a huge boost for a movement that has been going on in the black community for some time, but fortunately is now increasingly expanding into society." Thus highlighting the importance of diversity and inclusion within society and art. Click here to read more!

 

Policy on Appropriate Education in Schools

June 23rd, 2020

Policy team 23June2020

This is a snapshot of a fun and productive virtual meeting! As part of the NWO-funded "Breaking the cycle" project, Carolien, Sarah Giest and Reia Lee talked about the research into the policy dimension of appropriate education (or Passend Onderwijs, PO). Click here to read more about their research.

 

Inclusive Social Development in Schools

June 22nd, 2020

Adva loose parts4

How can schools adapt to different needs? Adva's project on inclusive schools is part of the Leiden-Delft-Erasmus affiliated Leading Fellows Postdoc program and in collaboration with the Centre for BOLD Cities. In a recent interview, Adva shares her outcomes on social inclusion of children with communication difficulties in schools: "Attending regular classes does not necessarily mean that students with communication difficulties are included socially. As social interactions are crucial for emotional development, it is important to see how mainstream schools can improve social participation," noted Adva. Read the full interview here.

 

Master Class: Item Selection to Identify Groups

June 12th, 2020

 MasterClass item selection June2020

On June 12th, we held a master class given by Dr. Paul Oosterveld. Paul explained logistic regression and discriminant analysis, and how to apply these techniques for building models to identify relevant features, e.g., which items discriminate best between individuals with or without autism. A follow-up master class on identifying biased items using the item-response theory will soon be held. Stay tuned!

 

Recent & Upcoming Events

June 26th 14.00-15.30 Webinar on Sensors (Part II)

BOLD Cities

Read more ...
June 18th 13.00-14.30: Webinar on Sensors

BOLD Cities

Read more ...
June 12th 11.00-13.00: Master Class on Factor Analysis

Universiteit Leiden

Read more ...

Back in the Office!

June 18th, 2020

FSW inside

On June 11th, Qi was the first from our lab to head back to the office since the lockdown. Qi's mission was to enter all children’s responses to the interview questions in the data file. 

Read more ...

Welcome to our new PhD candidate Maedeh Nasri

June 9th, 2020

Maedeh Nasri

Starting from June 8th, Maedeh Nasri joins our lab as a PhD candidate. Her multidisciplinery project is within the Centre for BOLD Cities, as part of the NWO-funded "Breaking the cycle" project, combining Psychology, Computer Science, Government, and Architecture.

Read more ...

Emotion awareness decreases internalizing symptoms in children with Developmental Language Disorder

March 30th, 2020

mental health brain puzzle

Children with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) often experience more internalizing symptoms, such as social anxiety. However, very little is known about the factors that protect children with DLD from developing such symptoms.

Read more ...

Who are we?

FOE group 2019 crop

Our team is located at the department of Developmental Psychology of Leiden University in the Netherlands. We work in close collaboration with the Dutch Foundation for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Child (NSDSK), the ENT department of the Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), the Centre for Autism, the Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer Science (LIACS), TU Delft, and University of Twente. Our group is dedicated to examining the emotional development of children and adolescents of all walks of life. We have a strong focus on the functionality of emotions, and its impact on children's social development. Besides typically developing children and adolescents, we are interested in the development of those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, with autism spectrum disorders, or with specific language impairments.

On this site we regularly post news items about new publications, events, and so on. You can also read more about our ongoing projects, read about and download questionnaires we have developed,
see an overview of our publications per topic, or read about opportunities for students to join our team.